Genio Fiorentino '06 - The Adoration of the Magi
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lunedì, 22 maggio 2006

05/22/2006. In the east-west hall of the Palazzo Medici Ricciardi, the complete series of images hidden under the painting of the Adoration of the Magi has been put on display for the first time. The famous painting, created by Leonardo da Vinci and a long-standing source of mystery, was also mentioned by Dan Brown in “The Da Vinci Code.” The author of the best-selling thriller, refering to press that had appeared in the U.S., had intimated at “photographs takes with infrared and x-rays by a Florentine scientist.” Photos from which one might hypothesize that “the anonymous painter, while filling in the spaces delineated by Leonardo, had strayed in a suspicious way from the tracing lines, in opposition to the true intentions of the artist.”

Which complex work is actually hidden in the Adoration of the Magi was able to be seen thanks to the work undertaken by Maurizio Seracini (the only non-fictional living person mentioned in “The Da Vinci Code”), when the entire masterpiece, once obscured beneath the painting, was revealed.

The work performed with sophisticated equipment by the Florentine engineer demonstrates that the monochromatic painting now visible was not the work of Leonardo da Vinci. An art historian, Antonio Natali of the Uffizi Museum, subsequently carried out a new iconographic reading and iconology of the Leonardian drawing. A recounting of the epiphany by the Genius of Vinci unfolds over the time and space in the various foregrounds.

In the film clip shown on the subject of the Florentine genius, many details of the painting will be visible, details which for centures were buried under the monochromatic painting that covers them. The images that run through the video show battle scenes, the reconstruction of the temple, and even an elephant. The work of Leonardo, according to the critics who have seen the hidden art, is of such intensity and plasticity so as to appear “in movement,” almost as if it were “anticipating” the future art of film.

Adorazione dei MagiAdorazione dei Magi